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The French Press, Press Pot, Cafetière, Plunger, are some of the many names for a very classic way to brew your favorite coffee. There’s a reason this method has stood the test of time, rich and luscious cups of coffee are the result of this full saturation brewing method. Not to mention the simplicity of this brewing process make the French Press or Plunger as they call it in Australia, a staple in every coffee lover’s home.

 It’s origins date back to a story of a French man who had already boiled his water before he had even taken time to grind his coffee. He scrambled to pulverize his coffee and throw it into the water. Once in the pot, the coffee grounds rose to the surface, he then filtered using a metal screen he had in his kitchen. Fitting the screen over the boiling pot, he used a spatula to press the screen down, holding the grounds to the bottom of the pot. And how was the coffee? Textured, rich, full bodied-viscous coffee. This mouthfeel is caused by the increased particles and oils in the coffee left behind by the use of a metal filter. Metal filters, as opposed to paper filters allow these sediments and oils to remain in the coffee creating a taste and vibe that is unique to the press.

 The first official French Press was documented in 1852 when the first French patent was placed by Mayer and Delforge, this model did not create a seal like today’s models. The second iteration of the French Press being patented in 1929 and arguably the most popular version patented in 1958. This model would gain popularity as it was released and distributed by a French company who named the glass cylinder in the metal housing Chambord. There are also several modern takes on the french press including ones that try to ease the cleaning process and many electric models that heat your water for you. 

The French Press is  a great entry level coffee brewing method capable of producing exceptional coffee, loved by coffee novices and aficionado all over the world! Some great coffees to brew in your french press are Bali Blue Moon, Sumatra and India. These three coffees will shine in the french press. The long saturation of grounds help to extract the rich flavors of stone fruit and chocolate in our Bali, dark chocolate and spice in our Sumatra, or big bodied earthy flavors in our Indian coffee. 

FRENCH PRESS METHOD

Ask your friendly barista to grind your chosen coffee coarsely for French Press. If you have your own grinder, use a coarse setting so the grounds are about the size of coarse sea salt (think Maldon salt pyramids or flakes)

If you are using a Bodum 8 cup French press you can make a full press using 62 grams of coffee and 900 grams of water. Use water that is just off the boil, preferably just before the water has boiled. 

 

-Pour 62 grams of coffee grounds into bottom of french press (you can cut this recipe in half)

-Pour water over coffee, ensuring all grounds have been wetted

-Set timer to leave grounds immersed in water for 3 minutes

-After 3 minutes break the “crust” of coffee that forms at the top

-Let steep for 1 minute more

-After a total of 4 minutes push down plunger 

-You are now ready to serve!

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